Diversity Timeline: Page 5 of 8

Diversity Through Time: 1970s

         1900s-1930s | 1930s-1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 21st Century

The Organization of Black Faculty and Staff (OBFS) is founded.

...

During the 1970s, Rutgers Law School-Newark hires both its first Latino professor, Jose Cabranes (now a judge of the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals), and its first black woman professor, Peggy Cooper Davis.

...

In 1971, faculty women in NCAS were frustrated by the Rutgers administration’s lack of response to their complaints about inequalities on the job. Professors Dorothy Dinnerstein and Helen Strausser spearheaded a federal complaint against NCAS, claiming discrimination against female faculty in several aspects, including the number of female faculty hired, salaries, promotion opportunities, and numbers of tenured female professors. The complaint charged that the university was in violation of equal opportunity regulations it was obliged to follow as a federal contractor. The federal government ultimately ruled in their favor, and ordered Rutgers to adjust pay scales for women to be equitable with male professors and to make retroactive payments to the female faculty to offset the previous inequities. The courageous actions of

Dinnerstein and Strausser forever changed Rutgers. To learn more:

...

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences-Newark establishes a program in Puerto Rican Studies, as well as an interdisciplinary major in Hispanic Civilization & Language Studies.

...

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, gay, lesbian, transsexual and transgendered students form a series of formal and informal associations, eventually establishing GALA – the Gay and Lesbian Alliance -- in the 1990s. This group evolved into GLASS – the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Society – in the 21st Century.

...

Rutgers Law School-Newark establishes its clinical program, consisting initially of the Constitutional Litigation Clinic, directed by Professor Frank Askin, and the Urban Legal Clinic, director by Professor Annamay Sheppard.

...

The Newark College of Arts and Sciences established the Women’s Studies Program one of the first in the nation. The program does more than examine the gender roles of both women and men; it also looks at issues of race, ethnicity, class, ability, national origin, religion and sexual orientation.

...

Rutgers Business School is chosen to among the first eight pilot programs for the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) concept developed by the US Congress. Since its inception, it has assisted nearly 300,000 established businesses and start-ups. Today the New Jersey SBDC is headquartered on the Newark campus, within the Rutgers Business School.

...

The Women’s Rights Law Reporter, the oldest legal periodical in the U.S. focusing exclusively on the field of women’s rights law, moves to Rutgers and becomes formally affiliated with the law school in 1974. The Reporter was founded by now-Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and f

eminist activists, legal workers, and law students.

...

Newark Law School Professor Nadine Taub founds the Women’s Rights Litigation Clinic.

...

The College of Nursing establishes the only discipline-specific EOF program in the state, helping qualified students from disadvantaged backgrounds to become registered nurses.

...

Rutgers Law holds the Equal Employment Opportunities Symposium to mark the 10th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of l964, particularly Title VII.

 

Back to Diversity Home

Pages