Have You Met Rutgers-Newark?

Ian Creese is a world expert in the field of dopamine receptors, especially in the area of antipsychotic drugs

If much of the human brain remains the undiscovered country, then Dr. Ian Creese is one of the explorers seeking to map it.

As co-founder/co-director of Rutgers' Aidekman Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Creese has shepherded the development of the center from concept to the reality of an internationally recognized center for neuroscience research, including brain development in children and infants and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's, disease, dyslexia and Parkinson's disease. As a researcher, the British-born Creese has conducted ground-breaking work in the field of psychopharmacology, including research on dopamine receptors and studies of brain functioning using antisense technology. Creese is regarded as a world expert in the field of dopamine receptors, especially in the area of antipsychotic drugs and the role of receptor changes in schizophrenia.

For his accomplishments, Creese was named a Rutgers Board of Governors Professor of Neuroscience in 2001, the University's highest academic honor.

Creese studied psychology at the University of Cambridge, where he earned his bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in experimental psychology, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University Medical School in Baltimore. He joined the faculty of the University of California at San Diego, School of Medicine, in 1978, before coming to Rutgers University, Newark, in 1987 to co-found the Aidekman Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, with Dr. Paula Tallal.

Creese has published nearly 150 research articles, scores of invited chapters and has edited four books. His research is so widely recognized that he was listed as a "Citation Superstar" by the Science Citation Index with more than 5,000 citations to his research.

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